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Course details 2010-2011  
    
Explanation of the teaching methods and assessment methods used in the course descriptions

Teaching Methods

CLASS CONTACT TEACHING: 

  • Lectures:
    A presentation to a large group of students, whereby the lecturer speaks and the students listen. Students may be actively involved by asking them questions, by letting them take a vote, by giving them an opportunity to defend a proposition etc.
  • Practice sessions:
    During such sessions, the students do exercises about the subject matter discussed in the lecture under the supervision of the lecturer or an assistant.
  • Seminars / tutorials :
    During such sessions, the students and the lecturer or assistant discuss specific course topics. The basis for the discussion may vary: an oral presentation, an additional reader, questions, papers by the students, etc. As a teaching method, ‘seminars’ are related to ‘tutorials’; most faculties/training programmes have a preference for one of the two terms.
  • Laboratory sessions:
    During laboratory sessions, the students, perform laboratory work, computer exercises or scientific experiments, either individually or in groups. 
  • Skills training:
    The students practise specific skills, such as conducting a conversation, oral pleading, measuring blood pressure etc.
  • Practical language study:
    The students practise language skills in a specially equipped language laboratory either individually or in groups.

PERSONAL WORK :

  • Exercises :
    The students practise specific (sub)skills or solution methods either individually or in groups.
  • Assignments :
    By carrying out assignments, the students acquire general, scientific and/or job-related competencies (such as data collection and processing, critical reflection, application of research methods and techniques, oral and written communication skills etc). Assignments often involve a written report and/or a presentation. Certain courses have specific requirements for the nature of their assignments, for example writing a comment in Law or a laboratory report in Chemistry.

    The students may be required to work individually or in groups. 
  • Case studies :
    The students practise their problem-solving skills on the basis of concrete and realistic cases or situations (from their future professional field) presented to them by the lecturer. Like other assignments, case studies often involve a written report and/or a presentation. The students may be required to work individually or in groups. 
  • Paper :
    The students study a scientific topic and produce a written report. A paper usually consists of the following components: a scientific problem definition, a specification of the research method applied, data collection and processing, findings and conclusions. In very general terms, there are two types of paper, i.e. literature surveys and reports on scientific experiments. The two approaches may also be combined. Papers may be written individually or in groups.

DIRECTED SELF-STUDY:

Using this method, the students learn independently. The lecturer or assistant supports the learning process by providing study assignments during the course or in the learning environment, through tutorials, questions and answers sessions, etc. During a Q&A session, the lecturer or assistant answers course-related questions from the students, summarises the course content, and discusses any problems students may be experiencing with the course.

EXCURSIONS :

Using this method, the students acquire knowledge, insight and skills by studying certain phenomena or situations outside the classroom or lecture hall (visit to Parliament, a waste-processing plant, a youth institution etc..) Often, students will also be required to carry out related assignments or scientific research, either individually or in groups.

PLACEMENT:

The students are given an opportunity to apply and perfect acquired competencies in a professional environment. They are supervised by someone from the department on the one hand and by a mentor from the professional environment on the other. Students are usually also required to write a paper on a topic relating to their practical training or to produce an experiential or reflective report or journal, possibly as part of a portfolio. 

PORTFOLIO:

Using the portfolio approach, students work on a series of assignments designed to gradually enhance their development of specific competencies. The portfolio of material collected by the student should allow the lecturer or assistant to follow and assess this development. In addition, the portfolio method encourages students to assume responsibility for their personal learning process.

PROJECT-BASED WORK:

Students assume a specific role (e.g. advisor, researcher, policymaker, expert etc) and, from this perspective, work on a practical issue and apply acquired competencies. Projects are usually quite lengthy and include defined deliverables such as a recommendation, a research report etc.. In project-based work, the students largely guide their own learning process. They may either work on the project individually or in groups. 
 

 

Assessment methods

  
EXAMINATION:

Using this method – usually at the end of the training component – the student is assessed on the basis of answers he or she gives to questions from the lecturer or assistant. Examinations may have various formats. Specify whether the examination is:

  • a written examination (with or without oral presentation) or an oral examination (with or without written preparation);
  • an open or a closed book examination;
  • a multiple-choice or an open-question examination.

The examination regulations stipulate that, in the case of an oral examination, the student is always entitled to a reasonable amount of time to prepare his or her answers in writing.
Some skills may be assessed during laboratory sessions (practical examination).

CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT:

Using this approach, the lecturer specifies a number of assessment points in the course of the academic year / semester resulting in (or contributing to) a final assessment. Continuous assessment may be based on:

  • exercises
  • assignments
  • case studies
  • (interim) tests
  • participation in classroom activities

Continuous assessment may imply that students who fail are unable to retake examinations (see the Teaching and Examination Regulations for specific stipulations). The method of continuous assessment may also be applied in combination with an examination.

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT:

Under this approach, the student is required to hand in a piece of written work on the basis of an assignment or a case study. Possible formats are: a paper on a specific course topic, a case study report, a report on a practical assignment, etc. Written assignments allow the lecturer or assistant to assess the content-related competencies as well as the writing skills of the student. The student may also be given an opportunity to defend the written assignment orally as part of the final assessment.

PORTFOLIO:

Using this approach, the student assembles a portfolio as proof of his or her learning process. Possible items for inclusion in a portfolio are: papers, presentations, solutions to exercises, self-assessments, laboratory reports etc. The student may also be given an opportunity to defend the portfolio orally as part of the final assessment.

DISCUSSION-BASED EXAMINATION:

This is a type of examination (with or without written preparation) where students either assume a role or are assigned one in a debate on an issue related to the subject matter. The students should put forward arguments for and against, and they are expected to engage in a debate with one another. The lecturer or assistant assesses both knowledge and skills displayed.

PRESENTATION:

The student is required to give an oral presentation of an assignment carried out or a case studied. Presentations allow the lecturer or assistant to assess the student’s content-related competencies as well as his or her oral communication skills.

PLACEMENT ASSESSMENT:

Placement may be evaluated in different ways. The lecturer may base his or her evaluation (in part) on an experiential or reflective report (possibly as part of a portfolio) or on a paper or report relating to a topic from the placement. In addition, the mentor from the professional environment may participate in the assessment of the student, e.g. by evaluating his or her practical performance on the basis of an assessment form containing specific evaluation criteria. Placement assessment usually implies that students who fail are unable to retake the examination (see the Teaching and Examination Regulations for specific stipulations).